Stuttering and the shy child
October 15, 2012
Carl Herder, M.A., CCC-SLP, BCS-F
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Since my return to the American Institute for Stuttering, I've been badgering the AIS staff about possible topics for new blog posts. I recently heard Amy Strekas share about her interest in shyness and its relation to people who stutter. So, naturally, I jumped on the opportunity to pay it forward to the AIS Blog. Thanks for sharing, Amy!

A Bashful Girl

Written by: Amy StrekasLet me be clear. Stuttering doesn’t cause shyness. And shyness doesn’t cause stuttering. However, sometimes children present with both, and the two traits interact with one another. So, I did some research to learn more about shyness in children to improve my therapy with young clients who presented with both traits.As a part of this process, I read a book about shyness in children. The book’s premise is that shyness is not a disorder. It describes how shy children often have very admirable qualities: they are good listeners, they have long attention spans, and they are good at entertaining themselves when alone. On the other hand, shyness can limit a child’s life in certain ways – socially and academically. The author provides tips for parents to help shy children gain confidence to express themselves with interacting with others. I found the book to be insightful, well written and clear. I highly recommend it to anyone working with a shy child.

The Shy Child Helping Children Triumph over Shyness Ward K. Swallow Ph.D.

top photo: wmstadler